There are Many Theories of Aging

In aging research, just as in any field of science where much is left to discover and catalog, and where the pace of discovery is slow in comparison to the size of the territory left to map, you will find a promiscuous proliferation of theories and hypotheses. A well constructed theory of aging can last for decades waiting to be disproved, all the while spawning variants and competitors. Hypotheses come and go almost like fashions when the time taken to gather sufficient evidence to swing the pendulum one way or another can extend for a sizable fraction of a researcher's career. This is something to bear in mind when reading any discussion of theories of aging: you are looking at a snapshot of science in development, the final answer still unsettled, all too many details yet to be filled in robustly and defensibly. The present consensus position on aging is that it is caused by an accumulation of damage. There are probably a score of good theories discussing exactly what damage is involved, and how important various different types of damage might be. There are another score of outdated, or dubious, or too narrowly focused, or myopic theories on aging as damage beyond that circle. On the small scale there are a hundred debates over cellular and tissue damage with relation to aging, all of which are waiting on better data for one side to declare a definitive victory. That will happen for some of these issues over the next decade, with the damage caused by cellular senescence ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs