Darryl Sleep

Senior Vice President, Head of Clinical Science and Asset Strategy for the Cardiovascular and Metabolic Therapeutic Area Unit With extensive global clinical and industry experience across multiple therapeutic areas Darryl Sleep, M.D. is Senior Vice President, Head of Clinical Science and Asset Strategy for the Cardiovascular and Metabolic (CVM) Therapeutic Area Unit (TAU) at Takeda Pharmaceuticals.  He leads the clinical science group as well as the program leaders within the CVM TAU that covers a wide pipeline portfolio including programs in the cardiovascular, diabetes, obesity, renal, and respiratory areas. Dr. Sleep joined Takeda in 2010 as Vice President Clinical Science and Therapeutic Area Clinical Head for Cardiovascular, GU and Renal, where he oversaw the development strategy and clinical programs within these therapeutic areas. In 2011, Dr. Sleep was appointed Head of the Biological Sciences and transformed the group into Exploratory &Translational Development responsible for the translation of Takeda’s pipeline from pre-clinical to early clinical development, working with both the research and development functions to establish proof of mechanism and proof of concept for drugs in development. In November 2012 Dr. Sleep was appointed Head of Clinical Science and Early Development in TDC Americas, integrating the clinical group from Exploratory &Translational Development into Clinical Science. Dr. Sleep was appointed as the Global Head of Clinical ...
Source: PHRMA - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news

Related Links:

AbstractPurposeTo study weight loss, comorbidity remission, complications, and nutritional deficits after duodenal switch (DS) and single-anastomosis DS with sleeve gastrectomy (SADI-S).Material and MethodsRetrospective review of patients submitted to DS or SADI-S for morbid obesity in a single university hospital.ResultsFour hundred forty patients underwent DS (n = 259) or SADI-S (n = 181). Mean preoperative body mass index (BMI) was 50.8 ± 6.4Kg/m2. Mean follow-up was 56.1  ± 37.2 months for DS and 27.2 ± 18.9 months for ...
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
The last decade has seen tremendous advances in the field of metabolic and bariatric surgery. Evidence from randomized trials continues to build showing that in addition to obesity, type 2 diabetes (T2D) and other diseases improve postoperatively1 –3, at least partially via weight-independent mechanisms4–6. Even though many attribute degree of obesity with severity of obesity-associated disease (e.g. diabetes, sleep apnea), this is not necessarily the case. Variables other than body weight clearly affect T2D development and severity.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionsThe three OSA phenotypes from multi-perspective clustering may provide a basis for precise therapeutic decision-making including craniofacial skeletal intervention beyond usual characterization of OSA subgroups.
Source: Sleep and Breathing - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The three OSA phenotypes from multi-perspective clustering may provide a basis for precise therapeutic decision-making including craniofacial skeletal intervention beyond usual characterization of OSA subgroups. PMID: 32219710 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Sleep and Breathing - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Tags: Sleep Breath Source Type: research
(CNN) — As the coronavirus situation intensifies, you might be wondering: How can I keep myself healthy? The answer lies in following the latest guidelines on social distancing, proper handwashing and your local stay-at-home directives. But there are also ways to strengthen your own immune system. Diet is one of them, and we covered that here in part one of our immunity boosting series. Yet what you eat is just one factor. Being physically active, meditating and managing stress, and getting adequate sleep help, too. Keep reading to find out why those habits boost your immunity and how you can take advantage of their ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health CNN Coronavirus Source Type: news
This study included patients who underwent primary laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) or laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). The primary outcome of interest was incisional SSI occurring within 30  days. Surgeries performed in 2015 were used in a derivation cohort and the predictive tool was validated against the 2016 cohort. A forward selection algorithm was used to build a logistic regression model predicting probability of SSI.ResultsA total of 274,187 patients were included with 71.7% being LSG and 28.3% LRYGB. 0.7% of patients had a SSI in which 71.0% had an incisional SSI, and 29.9% had an organ/spa...
Source: Surgical Endoscopy - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Abstract Primary Prevention of Acute Stroke Abstract. Strokes are frequent. Vascular risk factors are increasing the stroke risk. Most vascular risk factors are treatable. Their therapy is important in the primary prevention of stroke. According to the INTERSTROKE study, arterial hypertension, inactivity, overweight, dyslipidemia, smoking, unhealthy diet, cardiac pathologies such as major arrhythmia, diabetes mellitus, stress/depression and overconsumption of alcohol are the most important treatable vascular risk factors. In this article, we will also report on at present less well known treatable vascular risk fa...
Source: Praxis - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Praxis (Bern 1994) Source Type: research
By KOUSIK KRISHNAN, MD As many industries and individuals are struggling publicly with burnout, a new study from the European Journal of Preventative Cardiology links the “burnout syndrome” with atrial fibrillation (afib). The findings are both interesting and valuable. In general, the public benefits from anything that can raise awareness of heart disease, because early intervention directly impacts improved patient outcomes. However, headlines that describe afib as a “deadly irregular heartbeat” go too far in the name of public awareness. The truth is,...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Medical Practice Patients afib atrial fibrillation cardiac care irregular heartbeat Kousik Krishnan Source Type: blogs
This study was not perfect. You could argue, as these authors do, that the fact that participants chose their preferred diet is a good thing, as it could theoretically improve adherence. However, it also resulted in very different-sized groups to start with. The varying adherence and exercise option choices were adjusted for as well as possible. And the study relied heavily on self-reporting, which is always iffy. Healthy eating patterns have benefits beyond weight loss But we can still learn a great deal here. The Mediterranean approach to eating (which can be easily modified to suit any country or cultural food preferenc...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Cooking and recipes Diet and Weight Loss Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs
(Natural News) Many Americans get less than the recommended amount of sleep. Poor sleep has been linked to a variety of chronic diseases like heart disease, obesity and Type 2 diabetes. Now, recent research suggests that poor sleep can also deteriorate memory performance, especially in older adults. The National Sleep Foundation‘s inaugural Sleep Health Index...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
More News: Academia | African Health | Cancer & Oncology | Cardiology | Cardiovascular | Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery | Chemistry | Clinical Trials | Diabetes | Drugs & Pharmacology | Eating Disorders & Weight Management | Endocrinology | Heart | Hospitals | Marketing | Obesity | Pharmaceuticals | Respiratory Medicine | Science | Sleep Disorders | Sleep Medicine | Training | Trilipix | Universities & Medical Training | Urology & Nephrology