Characterizing a subtropical hypereutrophic lake: From physicochemical variables to shotgun metagenomic data

In this study, shotgun metagenomic sequencing was used to examine the taxonomic and functional structure of microbial communities in Lake Cajititlán during the rainy season. Several water quality features and their interactions with microbial communities were also assessed to identify the major factors affecting the water quality and biota, specifically fish species. According to current water quality regulations, most of the physicochemical variables analyzed (dissolved oxygen, pH, Secchi disk, NH4+, NO3−, blue-green algae, total phosphorus, and chlorophyll-a) were outside of the permissible limits. Planktothrix agardhii and Microcystis aeruginosa were the most abundant phytoplankton species, and the dominant bacterial genera were Pseudomonas, Streptomyces, and Flavobacterium, with Pseudomonas fluorescens, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and Aeromonas veronii representing the most abundant bacterial species. All of these microorganisms have been reported to be potentially harmful to fish, and the latter three (P. fluorescens, S. maltophilia, A. veronii) also contain genes associated with pathogenicity in fish mortality (fur, luxS, aer, act, aha, exu, lip, ser). Genetic evidence from the microbial communities analyzed herein reveals that anthropogenic sources of nutrients in the lake altered genes involved in nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, and carbon metabolism, mainly at the beginning of the rainy season. These findings suggest that abiotic factors influence the structure of...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research