Bone marrow cell transplants used to treat fractures, lung injury, and renal obstruction

(Cell Transplantation Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair) Mesenchymal stem cells have been transplanted to successfully treat several diseases and conditions. MSCs, which have the ability to self-renew and differentiate into specialized cell types, can be isolated from a variety of sources and have the ability to reduce inflammation and modulate immune responses. Three studies are discussed: MSCs promote fracture healing in rats; MSCs are therapeutic in treating mice with intrapulmonary acute lung injury; MSCs attenuate fibrosis in rat models of ureteral obstruction.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

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This study provides a possible reason why genes carrying health risks have persisted in human populations. The second found evidence for multiple variants in genes related to ageing that exhibited antagonistic pleiotropic effects. They found higher risk allele frequencies with large effect sizes for late-onset diseases (relative to early-onset diseases) and an excess of variants with antagonistic effects expressed through early and late life diseases. There also exists other recent tangible evidence of antagonistic pleiotropy in specific human genes. The SPATA31 gene has been found under strong positive genomic sele...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Alveolar macrophages are key regulators of the innate immune response and participate in the stem cell niche to organise tissue repair and lung homeostasis. The fate of donor alveolar macrophages is poorly understood as existing studies have relied on sex chromosome labelling or HLA typing methodologies. We sought to confirm the existence of a long-lived pool of donor-derived alveolar macrophages using single cell RNA sequencing in sex mismatched lung transplant patients.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: 365 Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, we show that calorie restriction is protective against age-related increases in senescence and microglia activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in an animal model of aging. Further, these protective effects mitigated age-related decline in neuroblast and neuronal production, and enhanced olfactory memory performance, a behavioral index of neurogenesis in the SVZ. Our results support the concept that calorie restriction might be an effective anti-aging intervention in the context of healthy brain aging. Greater Modest Activity in Late Life Correlates with Lower Incidence of Dementia ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, scientists screened cells from old animals to identify any RBPs that change upon aging. The screening showed that one particular protein, Pumilio2 (PUM2), was highly induced in old animals. PUM2 binds mRNA molecules containing specific recognition sites. Upon its binding, PUM2 represses the translation of the target mRNAs into proteins. Using a systems genetics approach, the researchers then identified a new mRNA target that PUM2 binds. The mRNA encodes for a protein called Mitochondrial Fission Factor (MFF), and is a pivotal regulator of mitochondrial fission - a process by which mitochondria break u...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study suggests that advantages and disadvantages vary by environment and diet, however, which might explain why evolution has selected for multiple haplogroups rather than one dominant haplogroup. This is all interesting, but none of it stops the research community from engineering a globally better-than-natural human mitochondrial genome, and then copying it into the cell nucleus as a backup to prevent the well-known contribution of mitochondrial DNA damage to aging. Further, nothing stops us from keeping the haplogroups we have and rendering the effects of variants small and irrelevant through the development...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Discussion of Mitochondrial Hormesis as an Approach to Slow Aging Cornelis (Cees) Wortel, Ichor Therapeutics Chief Medical Officer, on Rejuvenation Research and Its Engagement with the Established Regulatory System An Interview with a Programmed Aging Theorist An Interview with Reason at the Life Extension Advocacy Foundation An Interview on Mitochondrial Damage and Dysfunction in Aging An Interview with Vadim Gladyshev on Research into the Causes of Aging An Interview with Jim Mellon, and Update on Juvenescence A Lengthy Interview with Aubrey de Grey of the SENS Research Foundation An Interview with Peter de Keize...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, this is the first report to show that pyroptotic cell death occurs in the aging brain and that the inflammasome can be a viable target to decrease the oxidative stress that occurs as a result of aging. Reducing Levels of Protein Manufacture Slows Measures of Aging in Nematodes https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2018/12/reducing-levels-of-protein-manufacture-slows-measures-of-aging-in-nematodes/ Researchers here demonstrate that an antibiotic slows aging in nematode worms, providing evidence for it to work through a reduction in protein synthesis. Beyond a slowing of aging, one of the con...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Authors: Yabuki H, Watanabe T, Oishi H, Katahira M, Kanehira M, Okada Y Abstract Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is one of the main causes of primary graft dysfunction that accounts for 25% of mortality after lung transplantation. Disruption of blood supply and subsequent reperfusion result in organ damage with activating innate and adaptive immune response, leading to inflammatory insults. The IRI after lung transplantation is primarily manifested by permeability pulmonary edema on the basis of pulmonary vascular endothelial cell injury as seen in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Stem cells have poten...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
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