Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in an awake patient : Use of the mobile ECMO team for fulminant pulmonary embolism.

[Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in an awake patient : Use of the mobile ECMO team for fulminant pulmonary embolism]. Anaesthesist. 2015 Apr 21; Authors: Keller D, Lotz C, Kippnich M, Adami P, Kranke P, Roewer N, Kredel M, Schimmer C, Leyh R, Muellenbach RM Abstract The current report highlights the use of venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (va-ECMO) in a case of pulmonary embolism complicated by right ventricular failure. A 38-year-old woman was admitted to a secondary care hospital with dyspnea and systemic hypotension. Diagnostic testing revealed a massive pulmonary embolism. Thrombolytic therapy was unsuccessful necessitating thromboendarterectomy in the presence of cardiogenic shock. To allow the necessary transport of the highly unstable patient to a tertiary care center a mobile ECMO team was called in. The team immediately initiated awake va-ECMO as a bridge to therapy. Extracorporeal support subsequently allowed a safe transportation and successful completion of the surgical procedure with complete recovery. PMID: 25896415 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Der Anaesthesist - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Anaesthesist Source Type: research

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