Athlete’s foot cream could also treat multiple sclerosis

Conclusion This laboratory and mouse study has identified two drugs currently used for skin conditions – miconazole and clobetasol – that showed promise for treatment of conditions caused by myelin damage, such as MS. If a drug is already licensed for another condition in humans, this can make progress to human trials quicker if it is going to be given at a similar dose and in the same way. However, as the researchers point out, these two drugs are licensed for use on the skin – not to be taken orally or injected into the system. This means more work will be needed to ensure the drugs are safe enough to be used in this way in humans. The drugs' chemical structures may need to be modified to make them work efficiently and reduce side effects. Existing MS treatments act by dampening down the immune system, which attacks the myelin, so drugs that act in a different way, by repairing the myelin damage, could bring additional benefit. As yet, research into these drugs for MS is at an early stage, but many people will await with interest to see whether this early promise translates into better treatments. Analysis by Bazian. Edited by NHS Choices. Follow Behind the Headlines on Twitter. Join the Healthy Evidence forum. Links To The Headlines Athlete's foot drug may be MS therapy. BBC News, April 20 2015 Creams used to treat athlete's foot and eczema 'could REVERSE multiple sclerosis'. Mail Online, April 21 2015 Common athlete's foot cream 'could reverse multipl...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical practice Medication Source Type: news

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Purpose of review This review highlights recent progress in applying genome editing to the study and treatment of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Recent findings Recent work has shown that genome editing can be used to determine the pathogenicity of variants of unknown significance in patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells. These cells can also be used to test therapeutic genome editing approaches in a personalized manner. Somatic genome editing holds great promise for the treatment of CVD, and important proof of concept experiments have already been performed in animal models. Here we briefly review recent prog...
Source: Current Opinion in Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Tags: MOLECULAR GENETICS: Edited by Ali J. Marian Source Type: research
We present recent series examining sequencing of approved therapies while searching for predictive biomarkers. Finally, we examine trials evaluating novel agents that target certain biological pathways to highlight the likely future directions for progress in the clinical management of advanced prostate cancer.
Source: Current Opinion in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: GENITOURINARY SYSTEM: Edited by Arif Hussain Source Type: research
Purpose of review The present article highlights the most common DNA repair gene mutations, using specific examples of individual genes or gene classes, and reviews the epidemiology and treatment implications for each one [with particular emphasis on poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibition and PD-1 blockade]. Recent findings Genetic and genomic testing have an increasingly important role in the oncology clinic. For patients with prostate cancer, germline genetic testing is now recommended for all men with high-risk and metastatic disease, and somatic multigene tumor testing is recommended for men with metastatic ...
Source: Current Opinion in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: GENITOURINARY SYSTEM: Edited by Arif Hussain Source Type: research
Purpose of review The present review describes the current role of metabolic imaging techniques such as multiparametric MRI (mpMRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), hyperpolarized MRSI, and positron emission tomography (PET) in the diagnosis of primary prostate cancer, surveillance of low-grade disease, detection of metastases, and evaluation of biochemical recurrence after therapy. Recent findings The natural history of prostate cancer ranges from indolent disease that is optimally monitored by active surveillance, to highly aggressive disease that can be lethal. Current diagnostic methods remain imp...
Source: Current Opinion in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: GENITOURINARY SYSTEM: Edited by Arif Hussain Source Type: research
Purpose of review Urothelial carcinoma is one of the 10 most common forms of cancer in the world with more than half a million cases diagnosed yearly. The past few years have witnessed a revolution in understanding the biology of urothelial carcinoma and the development of promising therapies. In this review, we summarize the emerging therapeutic approaches in the management of advanced urothelial carcinoma. Recent findings Since 2016, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved five checkpoint inhibitors (CPIs), a fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) inhibitor, and an antibody drug conjugate (ADC) for the...
Source: Current Opinion in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: GENITOURINARY SYSTEM: Edited by Arif Hussain Source Type: research
Purpose of review Although testicular cancer remains a highly curable malignancy, challenges and uncertainty still remain in certain aspects of management. Residual disease after chemotherapy in patients with germ cell tumors (GCT) remains one of these challenges. We aim to highlight the recent literature on the management of residual disease after chemotherapy in GCT and the emerging innovations that may provide further guidance into this area. Recent findings A subset of patients with GCT will have residual disease after chemotherapy, and management of these patients involves highly skilled multidisciplinary experts...
Source: Current Opinion in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: GENITOURINARY SYSTEM: Edited by Arif Hussain Source Type: research
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Source: Current Opinion in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: HEAD AND NECK: Edited by Joël Guigay Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 4 February 2020Source: Seminars in Cancer BiologyAuthor(s): Thomas Efferth, Franz OeschAbstractThe oleogum resins of Boswellia species known as frankincense have been used for ages in traditional medicine in India, China and the Arabian world independent of its use for cultural and religious rituals in Europe. During the past two decades, scientific investigations provided mounting evidence for the therapeutic potential of frankincense. We conducted a systematic review on the anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities of Boswellia species and their chemical ingredients (e.g. 3-O-acetyl-...
Source: Seminars in Cancer Biology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
More than 70 percent of new drugs approved within the past 30 years originated from trees, sea creatures and other organisms that produce substances they need to survive. Since ancient times, people have been searching the Earth for natural products to use—from poison dart frog venom for hunting to herbs for healing wounds. Today, scientists are modifying them in the laboratory for our medicinal use. Here’s a peek at some of the products in nature’s medicine cabinet. A protein called draculin found in the saliva of vampire bats is in the last phases of clinical testing as a clot-buster for stroke patient...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Chemistry and Biochemistry Pharmacology Cool Creatures Diseases Medicines Natural Products Source Type: blogs
00:00 to 02.26—Dr. Bihari gives his background and credentials. Dr. Bihari: My medical training started at Harvard Medical School. I graduated in 1957. Then I trained in Internal Medicine at one of the Harvard teaching hospitals in Boston, Beth Israel, and then in Neurology at Massachusetts General in Boston. Then I went to the National Institutes of Health for two years doing brain physiology—brain research. I did another residency training in Psychiatry in New York, at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center and then, over the following five or six years, I got very involved in working in Drug Addiction. By 197...
Source: HONEST MEDICINE: My Dream for the Future - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Anecdotal Treatments HONEST MEDICINE Integrative Medicine Low Dose Naltrexone Obituaries Source Type: blogs
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