Depression Plus Diabetes May Boost Dementia Risk

Title: Depression Plus Diabetes May Boost Dementia RiskCategory: Health NewsCreated: 4/15/2015 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 4/16/2015 12:00:00 AM
Source: MedicineNet Alzheimer - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: news

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This study examined whether a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with age at onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in three racial-ethnic groups. METHODS: Data from 7,577 non-Hispanic Caucasian, 792 African American, and 870 Hispanic participants with clinically diagnosed AD were obtained from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center. Participants were categorized by the presence or absence of self-reported remote history of TBI (>1 year before diagnosis of AD) with loss of consciousness (LOC) (TBI+) or no history of TBI with LOC (TBI-). Any group differences in education; sex; APOE ε4 all...
Source: Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences - Category: Psychiatry Tags: J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci Source Type: research
Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic and progressive neurodegenerative disorder that affects over 46 million people worldwide. It is characterized by a decline in cognitive abilities, including memory and thinking skills. AD patients also suffer from behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia of which depression is the most prevalent. Currently available drugs provide modest symptomatic relief and do not reduce pathological hallmarks (senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles) and neuroinflammation, both of which are integral parts of AD. Studies suggest that AD is a type of diabetes manifested i...
Source: Current Medicinal Chemistry - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Curr Med Chem Source Type: research
AbstractBackgroundPeople with Alzheimer's disease (AD) often have multimorbidity and take multiple medicines. Yet few studies have examined medicine utilization for comorbidities comparing people with and without AD.ObjectiveThe aim was to investigate the patterns of medication use for comorbidities in people with and without AD.MethodsAn Australian population ‐based study was conducted using the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme 10% sample of pharmacy claims data.People with ADwere defined as those dispensed medicines for dementia (cholinesterase inhibitors, memantine, or risperidone for behavioral and psychological sympto...
Source: Pharmacotherapy: The Journal of Human Pharmacology and Drug Therapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Original Research Article Source Type: research
“In my case, symptoms began to appear when I was only 57. In fact, the doctors believe early-onset Alzheimer’s has a strong genetic predictor, and that it may have been progressing for some years before I was diagnosed.” – Pat Summitt  Anyone who’s gone through the experience of a loved one developing Alzheimer’s disease and progressively deteriorating to a shell of their former selves knows how devastating this brain disease is for both patient and those who love and care for him or her.  Memory Performance Changes May Show Up in 20s with Family History of Alzheimer’s St...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Aging Alzheimer's Memory and Perception Alzheimer's disease Dementia Source Type: blogs
There hasn’t been much good news about Alzheimer’s lately, between the March announcement by Biogen and Esai that a promising trial of a potential drug treatment failed, and the July decision by Novartis and Amgen to stop their study of another class of therapies for the neurodegenerative disease. But in a pair of studies presented at the annual Alzheimer’s Association International Conference on July 14, researchers reported encouraging results from studies of non-drug approaches. In one, scientists led by Dr. Klodian Dhana at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago followed nearly 2,500 people for alm...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Alzheimer's Brain embargoed study Source Type: news
This study sought to investigate what could be learned from how these men have fared. The men were born in 1925-1928 and similar health-related data from questionnaires, physical examination, and blood samples are available for all surveys. Survival curves over various variable strata were applied to evaluate the impact of individual risk factors and combinations of risk factors on all-cause deaths. At the end of 2018, 118 (16.0%) of the men had reached 90 years of age. Smoking in 1974 was the strongest single risk factor associated with survival, with observed percentages of men reaching 90 years being 26.3, 25.7, ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, we found that cofilin competes with tau for direct microtubule binding in vitro, in cells, and in vivo, which inhibits tau-induced microtubule assembly. Genetic reduction of cofilin mitigates tauopathy and synaptic defects in Tau-P301S mice and movement deficits in tau transgenic C. elegans. The pathogenic effects of cofilin are selectively mediated by activated cofilin, as active but not inactive cofilin selectively interacts with tubulin, destabilizes microtubules, and promotes tauopathy. These results therefore indicate that activated cofilin plays an essential intermediary role in neurotoxic signaling th...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study shows that mRNA levels of the aging related lamin A splice variant progerin, associated with premature aging in HGPS, were significantly upregulated in subjects with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2. Moreover, our data revealed a significantly positive correlation of BMI with progerin mRNA. These data provide to our knowledge for the first-time evidence for a possible involvement of progerin in previously observed accelerated aging of overweight and obese individuals potentially limiting their longevity. Our results also showed that progerin mRNA was positively correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP). This might suggest an as...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This popular science article discusses at length the chronic inflammation that is characteristic of the old, and its role as a proximate cause of age-related disease. Inflammation is a necessary part of the immune response to injury and pathogens, and when present in the short term it is vital to the proper operation of bodily systems. But when the immune system runs awry in later life, and inflammatory processes are constantly running, then this inflammation corrodes metabolism, tissue function, and health. The causes of excess, constant inflammation are both internal and external to the immune system. Internally, ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, our data support that plasma DAO levels were increased in PSD patients and correlated with brain WMH, independent of age, gender, hypertension, and renal function. Plasma DAO levels may therefore aid in PSD diagnosis. Introduction Stroke is a risk factor for both vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease (1, 2). Functional recovery develops over the course of 26 weeks after a stroke (3), but the survivors are often left with disabilities. In addition to the sequelae of acute neuronal damage, the 1-year post-stroke dementia (PSD) rates after first-ever and recurrent stroke are ~10 and 30%, respe...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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