How Heat Waves Could Have Long-Term Impacts on Your Health

Health officials from the U.S., the U.K., Europe, and Japan have been warning residents to stay out of the sun as the northern hemisphere experiences some of the highest early summer temperatures ever recorded. It’s not just to prevent heat-stroke, but to prevent the long-term consequences as well. As climate change drives summer temperatures even higher than usual, medical researchers are starting to find links between sustained heat exposure and chronic health conditions ranging from diabetes to kidney stones, cardiovascular disease and even obesity. “While increased risk for heat stroke is an obvious manifestation of global warming, climate change is actually causing health problems today, in both direct and indirect ways,” says Richard J. Johnson, a medical professor and researcher at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, and one of the world’s foremost experts on the intersection of heat stress and kidney disease. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] Hotter days bring an elevated risk of dehydration, says Johnson, which in turn can cause cognitive dysfunction, high blood pressure, and acute kidney injuries. Over time, the chronically dehydrated are less able to excrete toxins, leaving a higher concentration of salts and glucose in the kidneys and blood serum. Those substances are linked with an increased risk for diabetes and metabolic syndrome, a medical term that describes some combination of high blood sugar, high blood p...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized climate change Climate Is Everything Evergreen healthscienceclimate Londontime overnight Source Type: news