Is there Intracellular edema in congestive heart failure ?

I am unable to answer this question confidently even after spending 25 years in the specialty of cardiology. I thought, the answer was yes. Reality is definitely different. Such is the complexity in the biology of the fluid and circulatory systems. The heart’s function doesn’t seem to end with just pumping 6 liters of blood every minute, ultimately, it has to handle a huge load of water as well with delicate coordination with the kidney. (ANP,& RASS feedback). It is fascinating to note, that the heart transforms into a powerful endocrine organ as and when it is necessary. Read further, with a caution: (There is no specific physiological /molecular answer attempted) About 28 of the 42 liters of fluid in the body are inside the 100 trillion cells and are collectively called the intracellular fluid. Thus, the intracellular fluid constitutes about 40 percent of the total body weight in an “average” person. Still, cells are somehow protected from the edema creating hemodynamic force until the very late stages. Fortunately, the Interstitium is the place all excess fluid stagnates. This is a great biological adoption. The simplest explanation is (Na /K+pump never sleeps  ) Bi-directional osmotic forces keep the cell dry even in adverse cellular milieu. Can’t imagine the implications, if every cell begins to swell in early heart failure. Still, it does happen to some degree I guess. We never quantified this.( Andrew Boyle,et al  Myocellular and Intersti...
Source: Dr.S.Venkatesan MD - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: cardiac failure edema in heart failure Source Type: blogs